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What's Drifting

  • The Incredible Edible Flying Turkey
    With Thanksgiving less than a week away I d like to pause in brief appreciation for the bird that is... read more
  • Birding by Kayak
    One of the best aspects of paddling is being able to explore areas that are only accessible by small... read more
  • Aqua Therapy
    October is out November is in Thanksgiving is three weeks away The holidays are once again upon us F... read more

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Nuisance Species

What constitutes a nuisance species? The most common answer is a species that is non-native to a habitat or environment and threatens indigenous plants or animals. But more broadly defined, most people consider nuisance species anything that is annoying or bothersome to them in an outdoor or indoor setting. Most people would consider roaches, rats, fleas, and ticks to be nuisance species. Sure, they serve some ecological purpose and are part of the food chain that other animals may depend on. We can tolerate them if they stay out the house, and outdoor contact is kept at a minimum. What about more benign species like dandelion, clover, and wild onion? These plants are rich in medicinal and nutritious value, but are considered weeds, something to pull or poison. When defined by the general public, the term nuisance species takes on a more subjective meaning. If a species is deemed threatening, it could be considered a nuisance. The perception and reality of that threat may not align, but it may be enough to justify the removal or extermination of that species. With commercial and residential development and the inevitable habitat encroachment that it brings, the public will be encountering more wildlife. Removing dandelion and clover from your yard is one thing, removing an alligator is a bit more involved. Animals are fairly adaptable to changes in their environment. How adaptable we are to changes in their habitat remains to be seen, but is important to consider as we introduced those changes in the first place.

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The Expedition Organization  102 Brookwood Avenue  Wilmington, NC 28403  (910) 200-1594  Email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.